SharePoint 2010 – 2013 preupgradecheck

by sharepointbitme

For all of you who are considering an upgrade to SharePoint 2013 you may have noticed one feature that is missing from SharePoint 2010, the pre-upgrade check. In SharePoint 2007 (post service pack 2) there was an stsadm.exe -o preupgradecheck option that gave you information about possible issues upgrading your 2007 farm to 2010. In SharePoint 2010 that option is no longer available and instead the recommended upgrade tests are Test-SPContentdatabase , Test-SPSite , and Request-SPUpgradeEvaluationSite . These three PowerShell cmdlets can give you a lot of useful information, and they definitely tell you many of the things you need to know to successfully upgrade your 2010 farm to SharePoint 2013. These commands all come with one big problem, to use the above commands you have to have a SharePoint 2013 farm in which to run those commands. If you are just wondering about the upgrade to SharePoint 2013, but you aren’t yet serious enough to have installed a server you were out of options…until now!

To make some attempt at correcting this terrible injustice I have written a fairly basic PowerShell script that can give you some of the same information the old “preupgradecheck” option gave you. Information like what your farm’s build number is, what templates you have and what web uses which template, database sizes, solutions installed in the farm, etc. If you felt like it you would be able to get most of this information by digging around in Central Administration, SQL Management studio,  the SharePoint settings pages, or SharePoint designer, but this script may save you a little time. The script won’t tell you anything specific about the problems you may have upgrading to 2013, it just gives you all the information in one place to use as a reference. I hope you find it to useful, and you can find it HERE.

 

No Warranty Expressed or Implied. Use with caution (that applies to all PowerShell written by some random person on the internet). Do not drive or operate heavy equipment for at least 4 hours after using PowerShell. Side effects may include bleeding from the eyes (my code is not pretty), heart palpitations and severe migraine headache. Good luck.
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